Thursday, January 29, 2015

"MILDRED PIERCE" (2011) Photo Gallery

Below are images from "MILDRED PIERCE", Todd Haynes' 2011 adaptation of James M. Cain's 1941 novel. The five-part miniseries stars Kate Winslet in the title role:

"MILDRED PIERCE" (2011) Photo Gallery

Sunday, January 25, 2015

"NORTHANGER ABBEY" (2007) Review


"NORTHANGER ABBEY" (2007) Review

As far as I know, there have only been two screen adaptations of Jane Austen's 1817 novel, "Northanger Abbey". The first adaptation aired back in 1986. And the most recent aired on Britain's ITV network back in 2007, as part of a series of dramas called Jane Austen Season

"NORTHANGER ABBEY" followed the misadventures of Catherine Morland, the 17 year-old daughter of a country clergyman and Gothic novel aficianado. She is invited by her parents' wealthy friends, Mr. and Mrs. Allen, to accompany them on a visit the famous spa city, Bath. There, the friendly and somewhat naive Catherine becomes acquainted with Isabella Thorpe (who becomes engaged to her brother James), and her crude brother, John. She also befriends Eleanor Tilney and falls in love with the latter's brother, the witty and charming clergyman, Henry. 

The Thorpes are displeased with Catherine's friendship with the Tilneys, due to John's interest in making her his future wife. Both sister and brother assume that Catherine might become the future heir of the childless Allens. But when Catherine's relationship with the Tilneys - especially Henry - grows closer, a jealous Mr. Thorpe plays a prank by falsely informing Henry and Eleanor's father, the tyrannical General Tilney, that Catherine is an heiress. The joke leads the Tilney patriarch to invite Catherine to spend some time at the family's estate, Northanger Abbey. There, Catherine and Henry's relationship become romantic. However, between her penchant for Gothic novels, her overactive imagination and Mr. Thorpe's lie; Catherine's stay at Northanger Abbey threatens to end in disaster.

My review of the 1986 version of Austen's tale made it pretty clear that I harbored a low opinion of it. Fortunately, I cannot say the same about this 2007 version. Mind you, there were aspects of it that I found troubling.

As in the 1986 television movie, a castle (this time Lismore Castle in Ireland) served as Northanger Abbey. Was finding an actual estate with an abbey that difficult to find? Also, screenwriter Andrew Davies seemed determined to inject some form of overt sexuality into his recent adaptations of Austen novels. In "NORTHANGER ABBEY", he allowed the engaged Isabella Thorpe to have sex with the lecherous Captain Frederick Tilney, instead of simply flirting with him. My biggest problem with the movie turned out to be the last fifteen minutes or so. Quite frankly, I found the finale somewhat rushed. For some reason, Davies decided to exclude General Tilney's reconciliation with Catherine and Henry.

Frankly, I found the movie's flaws rather minor in compare to its virtues. I thought "NORTHANGER ABBEY" was a fun and delicious soufflé that proved to be one of the most entertaining 93 minutes I have ever seen on television. It is a wonderfully funny and elegant tale about the coming-of-age of the 17 year-old Catherine Morland. Andrew Davies did a pretty good job of conveying not only the charm of Catherine, but also the personal flaws that prevented her from opening her eyes to the realities of the world. But her acquaintance with the Thorpe siblings, General Tilney's vindictiveness and Henry Tilney's practicality finally opened those eyes. Another aspect of "NORTHANGER ABBEY" that I truly enjoyed was the array of interesting characters that participated in Catherine's journey to young adulthood. And it took a cast of first-rate actors to bring these characters to life.

Unlike other Austen fans, I had not been impressed by Sylvestra Le Touzel's portrayal of Fanny Price in the 1983 miniseries,"MANSFIELD PARK". Her performance as the giddy Mrs. Allen is another matter. Le Touzel gave a deliciously zany performance as Catherine's flighty and social-loving benefactress. And it is amazing how the actress' skills had improved after 24 years. Liam Cunningham made an impressive and rather foreboding General Tilney. In fact, he struck me as so intimidating that a black cloud seemed to hover about every time he appeared on the screen. William Beck, who portrayed the brutish John Thorpe, did not strike me as intimidating . . . only sinister. From a physical perspective. Yet, the moment the actor skillfully embodied the character, his Mr. Thorpe became a gauche and desperate loser who injected a "demmed" in nearly every other sentence that left his mouth. Carey Mulligan was wonderfully radiant, sexy and scheming as the manipulative Isabella Thorpe. She almost seemed like an intelligent Regency sexpot, whose lack of impulse control led to her downfall. And Catherine Walker made a charming and intelligent Eleanor Tilney.

However, it seemed quite obvious to me that "NORTHANGER ABBEY" belonged to the two leads - Felicity Jones and J.J. Feild. The role of Catherine Morland proved to be Felicity Jones' first leading role as an actress. And she proved that she was more than up to the challenge. She did an excellent job of portraying Catherine's development from an innocent and over-imaginative bookworm to a slightly sadder and wiser young woman. More importantly, her chemistry with J.J. Feild literally crackled with fire. Speaking of Mr. Feild, I can honestly say that his Henry Tilney is, without a doubt, my favorite on-screen Austen hero of all time. Everything about his performance struck me as absolutely delicious - his charm, his pragmatism, his wicked wit and occasional cynicism and especially his voice. Pardon me for my shallowness, but Feild has one of the most spine-tingling voices among up and coming actors, today. 

I also have to commend the movie's production values. David Wilson's production designs did an excellent job of conveying viewers back to the second half of the Regency decade. He was ably assisted by Mark Lowry's art direction and Grania Preston's costume designs, which struck me as simple, yet elegant and stylish. But it was Ciarán Tanham's photography that really impressed me. The movie's colors were rich and vibrant, yet at the same time, rather elegant. Tanham's photography did much to project the movie's elegant, yet colorful style.

I would never consider "NORTHANGER ABBEY" as one of the heavy-hitting Jane Austen adaptations. But it has such an elegant, yet witty aura about it that I cannot help but enjoy it very much. I was also impressed by Andrew Davies' development of the Catherine Morland character, which lead actress Felicity Jones did a great job of transferring to the screen. "NORTHANGER ABBEY" is, without a doubt, one of the most likeable Jane Austen adaptation I have ever seen, hands down.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

"Villification of Mace Windu?"


I just came across an essay in which the writer suggested that Jedi Master Mace Windu may have been slightly jealous of Jedi Knight Anakin Skywalker's power with the Force . . . and this would explain his "distrust" of Anakin in the third chapter of the Prequel Trilogy, "STAR WARS: EPISODE III - REVENGE OF THE SITH"

What was it about the Mace Windu character that led so many STAR WARS fans to create some ludicrous ideas about him? Mace jealous of Anakin? Up until the Jedi Council had learned of a connection between Sidious and someone in Palpatine's circle in the Extended Universe (EU) novel, "Labyrinth of Evil", Mace was firm in the idea that Anakin was the Chosen One. He had been since Anankin's participation in the Battle of Naboo and hinted this opinion to Jedi Knight Obi-Wan Kenobi in "STAR WARS: EPISODE II - ATTACK OF THE CLONES".

I have to wonder. In one scene of "REVENGE OF THE SITH", Mace had sharply ordered Anakin to sit down after the latter angrily responded to the news that other members of the Jedi Council would not promote him to Jedi Master. Did this scene anger many fans? Did they honestly believe that Mace had no right to admonish Anakin for the latter's angry behavior? Was this scene the reason why so many fans have expressed hostility or created these lame ideas about Mace over the years? By the way, here are some other idiot theories:

*Mace wasn't that strong in the Force, but was a skilled warrior

*Mace could have never defeated Palpatine on his own (according to Lucas, he, Yoda and Anakin were powerful enough to defeat Palpatine).

*Mace liked to tap into the Dark Side, in compare to other Jedi Knights and Masters.

*Mace was responsible for Anakin's turn to the Dark Side, because he had ordered Anakin to remain at the Temple during the attempt to arrest Palpatine.

*Mace was the one who had erased the Kamino files from the Jedi Archives and was, therefore, the Jedi traitor (this dumb theory popped up after "ATTACK OF THE CLONES was released).

*Mace's purple lightsaber represented his light and dark side (what represented Obi-Wan or Yoda's light and dark sides, I wonder?)

What was this stream of negativity directed toward Mace Windu by STAR WARS fans? Why did so many of them dislike him so much? Many fans had behaved as if Mace had no business being a Jedi Master. Was it because many fans did not like the idea of Samuel L. Jackson in one of science-fiction's biggest sagas? Did they believe that the only Jedi Master portrayed by an African-American actor had no right to behave in a superior manner to the white Chosen One? Or did these fans simply saw Jackson as John Shaft or Nick Fury? Who knows? But I have very little regard for them.

Monday, January 19, 2015

"SAN FRANCISCO" (1936) Photo Gallery


Below is a gallery featuring photos from the 1936 classic movie called "SAN FRANCISCO". Directed by W.S. Van Dyke, it starred Clark Gable, Jeanette MacDonald and Spencer Tracy: 

"SAN FRANCISCO" (1936) Photo Gallery



Thursday, January 15, 2015



I had nothing against the news of New Line Cinema's attempt to adapt J.R.R. Tolkien's 1937 novel, "The Hobbit" for the screen. But I had no idea that the studio, along with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Warner Brothers would end up stringing out the adaptation into three movies. Three. That seemed a lot for a 300-page novel. The first chapter in this three-page adaptation turned out to be the recent release, "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY"

Peter Jackson, who had directed the adaptation of Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy over a decade ago, returned to direct an earlier chapter of the author's tales about Middle Earth. He nearly did not make it to the director's chair. Guillermo del Toro was the first choice as director. However, del Toro Del left the project in May 2010 working with Jackson and the latter's production team, due to delays caused in part by financial problems at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. He did remain with the project long enough to co-write the movie's screenplay with Jackson, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens. To my utter amazement, the efforts of the four screenwriters and Jackson's direction has produced a good number of negative backlash against the film. Ironically, most of the film's backlash has been directed at Jackson and cinematographer Andrew Lesnie's use of high frame rate for the film's look. Others have simply complained about the movie's length and its inability to match the quality of the "LORD OF THE RINGS" Trilogy released between 2001 and 2003.

"THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" began on the elderly Bilbo Baggins' 111th birthday (shown in the 2001 movie), when he decides to recount the full story of an adventure he had experienced 60 years ago, for his nephew Frodo. Bilbo first reveals how the Dwarf kingdom of Erebor was taken over by a gold-loving dragon named Smaug. The Erebor Dwarves are scattered throughout Middle Earth. The Dwarf King Thrór was killed by an Orc, when he tried to settle his people in Moria. His son, Thráin II, was driven mad from one of the Rings handed over to his ancestor by Sauron before dying. Thráin II's son, Thorin Oakenshield, became determined to not only recover Erebor from Smaug, but also recover their treasure. At Gandalf the Gray's suggestion, Thorin and his followers traveled to the Shire to recruit Bilbo's help in achieving their goals (they need the Hobbit to act as a burglar in order to get their Arkenstone back). At first, Bilbo was reluctant to join their quest. But he caved in at the idea of an adventure and eventually joined the Dwarves and Gandalf. Their adventures led them to an encounter with three Trolls; pursuing Orcs who want Thorin's head for cutting off the arm of their war chief, Azog; a respite at Rivendell, due to the hospitality of Lord Elrond; and deadly encounters within the Misty Mountains with Goblins and for Bilbo, the current Ring bearer Gollum. The movie ended on the slopes of the Misty Mountains with a deadly encounter with Azog and his orcs.

How do I feel about "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY"? Well for one thing, I still believe it was unnecessary for a three-movie adaptation of Tolkien's 1937 novel. It is simply not big enough, despite the fact that this first film is shorter than the three "LORD OF THE RINGS" movie. I really do not see how Jackson would be able to stretch an adaptation of the novel into three movies, each with an average running time of 160-170 minutes. Judging from the movie's first 30 minutes, I see that Jackson is going to stretch it as much as he can. Many people have commented on the new high frame rate that Jackson and Lesnie used for the film. Yes, the movie has a sharper and more colorful look. In fact, the film's visual look reminded me of the use of Blu-Ray DVDs. Do I care? No. Hollywood critics and moviegoers have a tradition of ranting against any new film innovation - sound, color, digital cameras, CGI . . . you get the point. It has been ten years since George Lucas first used digital cameras for "STAR WARS: EPISODE II-ATTACK OF THE CLONES" and people are still bitching about it. Did I have a few problems with "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY"? Sure. Although many people have problems with the movie's first 20 to 30 minutes, claiming that the Shire sequence seemed to stretch forever. I only agree with that criticism to a certain extent. I had no problems with Bilbo's humorous first encounter with the Dwarves. But I thought Jackson lingered unnecessarily too long on the sequence featuring the elderly Bilbo and Frodo. And although I enjoyed the mind game between the younger Bilbo and Gollum, I have yet to develop any fondness for the latter character. And if I have to be brutally honest, I found Howard Shore's score for this movie less memorable than his work for the "LORD OF THE RING" films.

Despite the conflict over using three movies to adapt Tolkien's novel and Jackson's use of a new high frame rate, I have to say that I enjoyed "THE HOBBIT: AN UNDISCOVERED JOURNEY" very much. In fact, I enjoyed it more than I did the second and third movies from the "LORD OF THE RINGS" trilogy. Like 2001's "LORD OF THE RINGS: FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING", this new movie is basically a tale about a road trip. And there is nothing more dear to my heart than a road trip. Because Tolkien's 1937 tale was basically a children's story, "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" featured a good deal of more humor than was found in the "LORD OF THE RINGS" films. A great deal of that humor came from twelve of the thirteen Dwarves, whom Bilbo and Gandalf accompanied. Four of the funniest sequences turned out to be the Dwarves' arrival at an increasingly irritated Bilbo's home in the Shire, the traveling party's encounter with three Trolls obsessed with their stomachs, the Dwarves' reactions to Elvish food in Rivendell and Bilbo's mental duel with Gollum. Like the "LORD OF THE RINGS" movies,"THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" also featured some outstanding action sequences - especially the flashbacks about the downfall of the Erebor Dwarves; the traveling party's efforts to evade the Orc hunting party with the assistance of a wizard named Radagast the Brown; and their battles with both the Goblins, and Azog and the Orcs.

The movie featured some solid performances from the cast. It was good to see Cate Blanchett and Hugo Weaving as Lady Galadriel and her son-in-law Lord Elrond again. Although I am not a fan of the Gollum character, I must admit that Andy Serkis gave another memorable performance of the malignant changeling. However, I am a little confused by his portrayal of Gollum with a split personality, since the character's moral compass was not challenged by any acts of kindness in this film. Ian McKellen was commanding as ever as the wizard Gandalf the Gray. And it was also nice to see Ian Holm and Elijah Wood as the elderly Bilbo Baggins and Frodo Baggins again. I was a little taken aback by the presence of Christopher Lee reprising his role of the wizard Saruman, but merely as a supporting character and not as a villain. But I have to give kudos to Lee for revealing certain aspects of Saruman's personality that made his eventual corruption in the "LORD OF THE RINGS" saga.

But there were four performances that really impressed me. I really enjoyed Martin Freeman's portrayal of Bilbo Baggins. He did an exceptional job of projecting the character's emotional development from a self-satisfied homebody to the adventurer who wins the respect of the Dwarves with his heroic actions by the end of the movie. I first noticed Richard Armitage in the 2004 television miniseries, "NORTH AND SOUTH" and have been impressed with this actor ever since. I realized that his character Thorin Oakenshield is being compared to the Aragon character from "LORD OF THE RINGS". I would not bother. Thorin is a more complicated character. And Jackson chose the right actor - namely Armitage - to portray this heroic, yet prickly and hot tempered Dwarf. Thanks to Armitage's superb performance, it was not hard to understand Gandalf's frustrations over the character. If I must be honest, my memories of the twelve other Dwarves is a bit shaky. But there were two of them that stood out for me. Ken Stott was very effective as the elderly Balin, who provided a great deal of wisdom in the story. And I really enjoyed James Nesbitt as Bofur, who injected a great deal of charm and liveliness not only in his role, but also in the story.

I realize that "THE HOBBIT: AN UNDISCOVERED JOURNEY" has been receiving mixed reviews from critics. And honestly, I do not care. Mind you, it is not perfect and I see no need for a three-movie adaptation of Tolkien's 1937 novel. But I really enjoyed watching the movie. It reminded me of the joy I had experienced in watching the first "LORD OF THE RINGS" movie,"Fellowship of the Rings". And I believe that Peter Jackson and a first-rate cast led by Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman and Richard Armitage did an excellent job in adapting part of Tolkien's novel.

Saturday, January 10, 2015

"CENTENNIAL" (1978-79) - Episode Three "The Wagon and the Elephant" Commentary

"CENTENNIAL" (1978-79) - Episode Three "The Wagon and the Elephant" Commentary 

The third episode of "CENTENNIAL""The Wagon and the Elephant", picks up at least fifteen to sixteen years after the last episode ended. This episode also shifted its focus upon a new central character; a young Mennonite from Lancaster, Pennsylvania named Levi Zendt. 

The story begins in the early spring of 1845, in which young Levi Zendt irritates his more conservative family by forgetting to appear on time for Sunday supper with a local minister. This infraction proved to be nothing in compare what follows. Encouraged by the flirtations of a local Mennonite girl named Rebecca Stolfitz, Levi kisses her after they deliver market scrapings to a local orphanage. Unfortunately, Rebecca becomes aware that the orphanage’s head mistress is observing them and accuses Levi of attempted rape. The accusation not only leads Levi to be shunned by the Mennonite community, but also by his older brothers – include Mahlon, who had plans to marry Rebecca. The only people who know the truth are two late adolescent girls – Elly Zahm and Laura Lou Booker. After befriending Elly, Levi decides to leave Lancaster and head west to Oregon. He also makes a surprise visit at the orphanage and asks Elly to accompany him on the journey west, as his bride. During their journey west, Levi and Elly quickly fall in love. Upon their arrival in St. Louis, they meet three other men who will play major roles in their future – Oliver Seccombe, an Englishman with plans to write a book about the American West; Army Major Maxwell Mercy, the husband of Lisette Pasquinel, who has been assigned to find and establish an Army fort on the Plains; and the venal mountain man Sam Purchas, who acts as a guide to the wagon train that the Zendts accompany.

"The Wagon and the Elephant" is without a doubt, my favorite of all the twelve episodes featured in "CENTENNIAL". I love it. I am not saying that it is perfect. But I love it. I do have a few quibbles about the episode. One, I was not that impressed by Helen Colvig’s costumes for the female characters. I am willing to give leeway to the costumes worn by Stephanie Zembalist, Barbara Carrera and Christina Raines; considering their characters’ social positions. But the costumes worn by actress Karen Carlson and numerous female extras portraying middle and upper-class females seemed a bit . . . cheap. It seemed as if Colvig failed to put much effort into their costumes, in compare to the female costumes featured in "Only the Rocks Live Forever" and "The Yellow Apron". Another complaint I have is the presence of white families in the sequence that featured Major Mercy and McKeag’s efforts to negotiate with various tribes for help in establishing an Army fort. This particular incident occurred after the Zendts, Oliver Seccombe, Sam Purchas and the rest of the wagon train continued its journey west. Which meant that Mercy and McKeag’s meeting with the Pasquinel brothers and other tribal leaders must have occurred in mid-to-late August. Any westbound white emigrants still at Fort Laramie (Fort John) during that time of the year, had probably left western Missouri a good deal later than any emigrant with common sense would. The presence of those white families at Laramie in that particular sequence made not only lacked any logic, but was also historically incorrect.

But these are minor quibbles in what I otherwise consider to be a superb episode. I have admitted in past reviews of my love for tales featuring long distance traveling. This theme was featured in "The Wagon and the Elephant" in a manner that more than satisfied me. The episode covered the Zendts journey from Pennsylvania to (present day) Northern Colorado with plenty of drama and action that left me breathless. Although this chapter in James Michner’s saga was set in 1844 in the novel, producer-writer John Wilder had decided to set it one year later. Why? Who knows? And frankly, who cares? After all, this minor change did no harm to the story. But I never understood why he made the change in the first place. Another aspect about this episode is that after watching it, I realized that it served as the first half of a two-part tale that introduced Levi Zendt into the saga. The incidents in "The Wagon and the Elephant" severed Levi from everything that was familiar to him in Pennsylvania – family, home, and all of his assets. By the end of the episode, McKeag spoke of how Levi’s losses and upheavals brought him to a crossroad in his life.

After watching "The Wagon and the Elephant", I was amazed at the number of memorable moments featured in it. Those moments included:

*A tardy Levi and the rest of the Zendt family entertain the Reverend Fenstermacher for Sunday supper

*Rebecca Stolfitz falsely accuses Levi of attempted rape

*The elderly Mrs. Zendt encourage Levi to leave Lancaster and head west

*Levi and Elly meet Oliver Seccombe for the first time

*Oliver introduce Sam Purchas to the Zendts and Major Mercy

*Purchas exchange the Zendts’ team of gray horses for oxen

*Levi’s conversation with Sergeant Lykes about "seeing the elephant"

*The wagon trains’ encounter with Jacques and Michel Pasquinel

*Maxwell Mercy introduce himself to McKeag, Clay Basket and Lucinda as Pasquinel’s son-in-law at Fort Laramie

*Mercy and McKeag’s meeting with the Pasquinel brothers, Broken Thumb, Lost Eagle and other tribal leaders

*Purchas’ attempted rape of Elly

*The Zendts’ decision to part from the wagon train and return east

*McKeag and Levi form a trading partnership

*Elly’s encounter with a rattlesnake

I could go into detail on the scenes mentioned above, but that would require an entire article on its own. The fact that this episode featured so many memorable scenes made it a favorite of mine. However, there are two or three scenes that I had failed to mention. Two of them featured private and intimate discussions between Levi and Elly, conveying their deepening love for one another. But my favorite scene featured Levi’s arrival at the local orphanage to ask Elly for her hand in marriage and to accompany him on his journey to Oregon. With John Addison’s score and the first-rate performances by Gregory Harrison, Stephanie Zimbalist and Leslie Winston; director Paul Krasny created a magical and emotionally satisfying scene that still makes my skin tingle . . . and tears fall.

But it was not only Krasny’s direction and Jerry Ziegman’s script that made this episode so memorable. "The Wagon and the Elephant" also featured some superb performances. They came from the likes of Richard Jaeckel, who was given a chance to shine in his “seeing the elephant” speech; John Bennett Perry, who effectively portrayed Levi's overbearing older brother, Mahlon Zendt; Leslie Winston, who shone in two scenes as Elly's vivacious best friend, Laura Lou Booker; Stephen McHattie, who gave a first hint of his brilliant portrayal of the mercurial Jacques Pasquinel; Chad Everrett, who provided a great deal of strength as Major Maxwell Mercy; and Irene Tedrow, who gave a very warm portrayal of the compassionate Mrs. Zendt. Before portraying Sam Purchas in this episode, Donald Pleasence had portrayed a mountain man in the 1965 comedy, "THE HALLELUJAH TRAIL". In "CENTENNIAL", he ended up portraying a very unpleasant frontiersman, namely the venal Sam Purchas. Although Pleasence’s Purchas was not what I would call a complex character, I must admit that he was memorable and the British actor portrayed him with a great deal of relish. Richard Chamberlain continued his role as Alexander McKeag in this episode. Although his role had been diminished, he still continued his superb portrayal of the character. And Timothy Dalton made his first appearance as Oliver Seccombe, the Englishman that ended up falling in love with the West . . . for better or worse. Even in "The Wagon and the Elephant", Dalton would skillfully provide a great deal of charm and moral ambiguity in what I believe turned out to be one of his best roles ever.

However, "The Wagon and the Elephant" truly belonged to Gregory Harrison and Stephanie Zimbalist as Levi and Elly Zendt. Years ago, I had learned that these two had worked together at least four times. It seemed a pity that they did not work more often together, because these two were magic. They took a couple that seemed unrequited (at least from Elly’s point of view) at the beginning of their marriage and created one of the most loving and believable romances in the entire miniseries. They really were quite wonderful. I wish I could say more about their excellent performances . . . but I suspect that I have said enough.

In fact, I believe I have said enough about "The Wagon and the Elephant". I mean . . . what else can I say? Producer John Wilder took a first rate script written by Jerry Ziegman, an excellent cast led by Gregory Harrison and Stephanie Zimbalist and one of my favorite themes – long distance travel – to create what has become my favorite episode in"CENTENNIAL"

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

"JANE EYRE" (1996) Photo Gallery


Below are images from "JANE EYRE", the 1996 adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel. Directed by Franco Zeffirelli, the movie starred William Hurt and Charlotte Gainsbourg: 

"JANE EYRE" (1996) Photo Gallery




jane eyre 96

jane eyre8













samuel west 1996